Point of Sale (POS) Research

As per Section 5 of the Cigarettes And Other Tobacco Products Act (COTPA), 2003, direct or indirect advertisement of all tobacco products is prohibited in all forms of audio, video and print media. A point of sale display aims at drawing the customer’s attention to the brand, to maintain sale among loyal customers and attract new ones. The POS communication attempts to influence customer’s buying decisions. In May 2015, the Salaam Bombay Foundation surveyed 1,100 randomly chosen tobacco shops to identify such point of sale strategies employed by tobacco companies across Mumbai and found the following.

POS Research

RESULTS OF POS RESEARCH

The survey found widespread violations of POS promotion laws in Mumbai. Nearly all vendors surveyed reported that tobacco companies provided the displays in violation of COTPA. More than 50% of vendors received cash orgoods from tobacco companies as an incentive to displaythe advertisements.

It was concluded that the SBF programme represented an effective model of school-based tobacco use prevention that low-income schools in India and other low and middle-income countries can replicate.

Action Taken:

BMC The Brihan Mumbai Municipal Corporation incorporated Section 5 of the COTPA, 2003 into the MMC Law, 1888 for issuing new licenses the BMC License Department issued instructions to remove POS advertisements.

 

Police The Mumbai Police removed 538 advertisements.

 

 

Results:
It was observed that though there is a ban on the sale of tobacco products within 100 yards of educational institutes, 61% don’t comply with this ban. The survey also revealed that 307 tobacco selling shops operate within 100 yards of 122 schools. 30% of them do not have an operating license at all. As a result a circular released by the Public Health Department of the MCGM directed all beat officers working under Education and Medical Officers to initiate action against any tobacco selling establishment within 100 yards of an educational institution.

 


LIGHTS…CAMERA…AADESH!

It was American jazz legend Duke Ellington who said, "A problem is a chance to do your best." 18-year-old Aadesh Janjal seems to have taken this quote to heart as the youngster continues to shine in the field of amateur theatre. Aadeshs’ father, the sole bread winner for his family, passed away when he was a child, and left Aadeshs’ family in monetary turmoil. Growing up in shadowy Mumbai by-lanes was not easy but his mother wanted only the best that life had to offer for her son. She took up odd jobs as a house maid and ensured that Aadeshs’ education did not suffer. It was in school that he first aspired to be an actor and began chasing his dream. He was discovered by the Salaam Bombay Academy of the Arts which took him under its wings in 2009. Aadesh has participated in several theatre competitions across Mumbai and has performed at noted festivals. He also won an award for his performance at a drama competition organised by Fellowship International School. The jewel in his crown so far is the acting stint he secured in the Marathi film ‘Porbazar’. He was also the Assistant Director for the project. Today, Aadesh continues getting his education as it is something he doesn’t want to give up. He does part-time jobs and continues chasing his passion of becoming a talented actor. He wants to get a degree in Mass Media or study engineering but above all, wants to continue giving the actor in him a voice. Today, Aadesh continues getting his education as it is something he doesn’t want to give up. He does part-time jobs and continues chasing his passion of becoming a talented actor. He wants to get a degree in Mass Media or study engineering but above all, wants to continue giving the actor in him a voice.

 

SPARKLING SHRUTI!

Shruti’s story is that of an amazing transformation backed with enormous will power. Daughter of an electrician, Shruti’s family decided to move to Mumbai from Hyderabad for better livelihood. For her, Mumbai was a whole new world and language was a major barrier as she studied in an English Medium School in Hyderabad and her mother tongue was Telugu. Her parents took admission in Andheri West Municipal English School for 6th class. At first she felt uncomfortable to communicate with other friends as they spoke Hindi or Marathi and she was able to make only one friend throughout the school year. But the very next year her introduction to the Salaam Bombay Media Academy turned her life upside down. During her time there she focused hard on her language skills and interpersonal skills. Soon her hard work paid off and she started writing stories and articles in Hindi as part of her course curriculum. This had a positive effect on her social life and she now has many friends in school. She was even awarded as 'Student of the year' for her accomplishments. She has currently taken keen interest in photography and is training hard to become a pro.

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